Marie Boisrenaud



Home

Exploring
Anne's World

School Visits

Teacher
Workshops

Library Visits

Church
Programs

Civic Programs

Kids Explore

Anne's
Calendar

Links To
Explore

Contact Anne



LIBRARY PRESENTATIONS

Presentations are designed to meet your needs in time length and content.
Time: 10 - 60 minutes (Question and Answer time can follow)

Anne’s passion for living history is contagious—she has fun and so does the audience. When she says she loves what she’s doing, the usual response is, “That’s obvious!”

 As a character interpreter, Anne uses information from historical research, instead of a script. The intensity increases as the audience’s perception of her fades and a person from the past takes her place. Children’s faces light up as they realize that people in history books were real and had problems similar to ours.      

CHILDREN

Action on the High Seas
An old sailor spins tales of a cabin boy’s life. Learn what happens when the boy disobeys. Explore the innermost workings of a French ship in the 1700's. Can you even begin to guess what secrets and treasures lay hidden deep within a sailor's sea trunk? As you climb high aloft to loosen the sails, you may spot pirates about to attack the ship! But a cabin boy's life isn't all work—there are singsongs during the dogwatch (early evening) and sea yarns told by sailors.

“Your presentation was very interesting and informative. We always learn a lot.”
Nancy Fitzgerald, Librarian
Bay Minette Public Library
Bay Minette, AL

Neighbors to the Rescue (Florida Libraries)

Ages 3-8: Sail with the LaSalle family from France to Pensacola in 1701. Madeline LaSalle lets you see and touch artifacts used on the ship, and you will feel the fear as pirates attack. She tells funny stories about her three sons; the man with a silver nose who loved chocolate; and buffalo hunting. Experience Christmas at Santa Maria de Galve (Pensacola). The French from the ships, the Spanish men at the fort, and Indians help each other.

 “I liked the roach dance!” (Most quoted response—Kindergarten-adults)

Ages 9-12: Madeline LaSalle weaves early Florida history into her experiences with pirates, alligator attacks, and bone-pickers. Students see and touch artifacts as she tells of the voyage from France to Pensacola in 1701. She tells funny stories about her three sons; the man with a silver nose who loved chocolate; and buffalo hunting. She vividly describes hair-raising experiences of a teenage cabin boy who lived in Indian villages (gore appropriate for age levels).

“The program was funny!”
“The thing that made sparks was cool!”

Fourth grade students, Springfield, FL

Adventures of Alabama’s First French Family
Experience thrills and fears with Nicolas, Simon, and Francois as they travel from France to the new land of La Louisiane. Storms, pirate attacks, and alligators will keep you on the edge of your seat. The boys discover that neighbors have to help each other, even if they speak different languages and have different customs.

Life in the Williamsburg Gaol (Jail)
John Pelham’s family lived in the Williamsburg gaol. His father, Peter, was keeper of the jail, as well as church organist and clerk at the Capitol across the street. John knew many people who came to Williamsburg—George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry. Action and excitement drew him like a magnet, as he kept up with all the latest happenings in Virginia. His mother, Ann Pelham, tells you all about his escapades. (Almost a hundred years later, a relative also named John, was a Civil War hero from Alabama. General Robert E. Lee called him “The Gallant Pelham” because of his bravery.)





  Click To Enlarge

My Cousin, Thomas Jefferson
Betty Randolph, a leading lady of Colonial Williamsburg, tells interesting and funny stories about Thomas Jefferson. She also explains the sad events in Philadelphia that put him in a position to write the Declaration of Independence.

My Husband, George Washington
Martha Washington tells exciting and funny stories about her life with George.

The Spy Glass
Using the book, The Spy Glass, by Richard Paul Evans, Anne Dalton tells a story about a spyglass that enables the viewer to see what might be— instead of what is. Imagination is ignited by the spark of faith, and with faith comes hope and change. By sharing a vision and inspiring people to work together, goals can be achieved that benefit individuals, communities—even the whole world. The story is adapted to inspire visions for local situations.


Strange and Scary Happenings

Old Jeffrey
Susanna Wesley tells of her home being invaded by a ghost in 1716. Samuel and Susanna didn’t believe in such things, but they couldn’t ignore the loud groans, stamping of feet, the sound of breaking bottles, and knocks. Sometimes the house shook from top to bottom. “Old Jeffrey” as the children called the ghost, made it very plain that he didn’t like Rev. Wesley, but little Hetty was his favorite family member.

Pegues Ghost
Imagine being stalked by a large ball of light! Matilda Bell describes this strange occurrence and other spooky things that happened in Cahaba. 

 

 

 

YOUTH

Capture Not Defeat
St. Michael sailed from France to La Louisiane as a 14-year-old cabin boy. He experienced many life-threatening situations living in Indian villages to learn their languages. Learn how the Chickasaw and Choctaw used stories about him to try to control French leaders. Hear of his daring acts when he’s captured on a buffalo hunt by the Alabama Indians.  

Daring Adventures of a Cassette Girl
Marie Boisrenaud shows artifacts as she recounts the dangerous voyage of French girls to La Mobile. Each soon-to-be bride had her dowry in a small trunk called a cassette. Independent and strong-willed Marie didn’t approve of the way Commandant Bienville ran the colony. Battle lines were drawn when she sided with colonists against him, and he prevented her marriage to the man she loved. Marie tells sad and funny tales about life in the wilderness—colonists battling Indians, disease, and each other.    

The following presentations are adapted for youth.
(More mature content, including guts and gore.)

•   Adventure on the High Seas
•   Life in the Williamsburg Gaol (Jail)
•  The Spy Glass
•  Trials and Triumphs of a Cassette Girl
 •  Old Jeffrey
 •  Pegues Ghost

 ADULTS

HISTORY
Dressed in period clothes, Anne Dalton includes humor and hope as she portrays 18th century women.

Marie-Francoise de Boisrenaud 18th century French governess of the Cassette Girls
Madeline LaSalle 18th century French colonist
Betty Randolph My Cousin,  Thomas Jefferson’s  - 18th century Colonial America
 
Ann Pelham Wife of Peter Pelham, Bruton Parish organist and keeper of the jail (Great-grandmother of John Pelham, AL Civil War hero) - 18th century Colonial America
 
Susanna Wesley 18th century English woman - mother of John Wesley, founder of the Methodist Church and Charles Wesley, hymn writer.
 

Trialsand Triumphs of a Cassette Girl  Marie Boisrenaud
(Marie Boisrenaud)

In 1704, virtuous young French women—each with her dowry in a small trunk called a cassette—came to La Louisiane as prospective brides of the restless young bachelors. Marie acted as governess and matchmaker to the younger women, but she ended up a spinster. Independent and strong-willed Marie confronted Commandant Bienville about his methods of running the colony. Battle lines were drawn when she sided with colonists against him. In retaliation, he prevented her marriage to the man she loved. Marie tells sad and funny tales about life in the wilderness—colonists battling Indians, disease, and each other.    

Adventure of Alabama’s First French Family (Madelaine Madelaine LaSalleLaSalle)
Madelaine LaSalle was the only woman to arrive on Massacre Island (Dauphin Island, AL) in 1702 with over 100 men. Her husband, Nicolas LaSalle, was in charge of supplies for the new colony at La Mobile. Share the adventure, fear, and hope of the LaSalle family as they travel from France to La Mobile.

My CBetty Randolphousin, Thomas Jefferson: (Betty Randolph)
Betty Randolph, a leading lady of Colonial Williamsburg, tells family stories about Thomas Jefferson. Her husband, Peyton—Thomas’s cousin—was president of the First Continental Congress. Hear her account of Peyton’s death in Philadelphia, which put Thomas Jefferson in position to write the Declaration of Independence. Learnabout the beginning of the Library of Congress.

 

The Jailer’s Wife (Ann Pelham)Ann Pelham
Ann Pelham raised 5 of her 14 children in the Williamsburg gaol (jail). Her husband, Peter—organist at Bruton Parish Church, clerk in the House of Burgess among other jobs—was one of Williamsburg’s most respected citizens. Ann tells of her struggles with her duties as the jailer’s wife, caring for a large family with constant financial hardships, and socializing with the elite of Virginia. She reveals tidbits about their most famous prisoner, Henry Hamilton, the “Hair-Buyer” and Thomas Jefferson’s reactions to him. Ann looks almost a hundred years into the future and tells about her great-grandson, John Pelham. General Robert E. Lee called the famous Civil War hero from Alabama the “Gallant Pelham”. 

Mother of the Wesleys (Susanna Wesley)
Mother of 19 children, Susanna Wesley was an educated and strong-willed woman of the 18th century. Seven daughters and three sons lived to adulthood. Susanna is remembered because of her sons, John and Charles. John was the founder of the Methodist Church, and Charles wrotemany hymns including “Oh For a Thousand Tongues to Sing” and “Christ the Lord is Risen Today.”

Because of social changes instigated by John Wesley, some give him credit for averting a revolution in England similar to the one in France. This presentation isfrom a historical perspective—not denominational.

Inspiration

The Spyglass
Using the book, The Spy Glass, by Richard Paul Evans, Anne Dalton tells a story about a spyglass that enables the viewer to see what might be— instead of what is. Imagination is ignited by the spark of faith, and with faith comes hope and change. By sharing a vision and inspiring people to work together, goals can be achieved that benefit individuals, communities—even the whole world. The story is adapted to inspire visions for local situations.

Humor

102 And Still a Doll (Adults)

Great-Grandma Barbara Doll is not just another pretty face—she’s been part of the action in Alabama’s history. Barbara is an avid reader and still has an active imagination. On her 102nd birthday when reporters show up, she knows they want to hear good stories. Starting with her earliest memories—stars falling on Alabama, she gives graphic details of being hit by one. Her marriage to Kenneth Doll in 1919 was a big event—Alabama celebrated its 100th birthday on her wedding day. Ken always called her “Baby”; however, great-grandchildren prefer Barbie. “Baby” worked for women’s right to vote, rode the bus with Rosa Parks, and warned George Wallace not to stand in “the school house door”. She even shares her secret of how to be in on the action.

The Three-Century Woman
Great-Grandma Breckenridge's claim to fame is that she's lived in three centuries. In January of 2001, reporters came to Whispering Oaks, Elder Care Facility to hear some of Mrs. Breckenridge's experiences. She knows they want something exciting, so she tells them "stories" that make her into Super Woman. Based on "The Three-Century Woman" by Richard Peck in Second Sight: Stories for a New Millennium.
 

The Case of the Stolen Stove  (10-15 minutes)
Imagine coming home to a house that has been burglarized. However, the only thing missing is the stove. With expertise, Anne Dalton tells you how to handle the situation.


 

 

Home | Teacher Workshops | School Visits | Library Visits | Church Programs | Civic Programs | Kid's Explore | Calendar | Contact

© copyright Anne C. Dalton 2003-2004